Prosa de Locura y Sexo (Spanish Edition)

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Studies Latin American cinema as a device of gender system formation and reinforcement, and as criticism of patriarchal hegemony; discusses questions related to sexuality depicted in Latin American films. Violence in Spanish Film. Focus on representations of violence in film from and about Spain since the s to present. Includes the Spanish Civil War, torture, and other state-sanctioned violence; children and violence; violence against women; homophobic violence; terrorism; and ethnic and racist violence. Latin American Film and Culture. Overview of Latin American cinema from the silent era to present, with an emphasis on the last forty years.

Latin American Literature and Film. Studies, in a broad sense, the connections between Latin American cinema and literature, through extensive readings and in-class movie exhibitions. A number of renowned literary works by Latin American authors and their film versions will be analyzed with a comparative approach.

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Examination of the notion and uses of Caribbean mediascapes; in other words, the uses of media technologies derived from film, television, the internet and YouTube, and the ways they are used and read in the Spanish Caribbean. From Nezahualcoyotl to Radio.


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Examines how Indigenous writers, intellectuals, and cultural producers have creatively established their own voices through writing and other forms of media. Examines the United States Latino literary and cultural production from multidisciplinary perspectives, such as literature, film, music, and performance. Analysis of the literatures and experiences of United States Latino writers and artists in their historical and cultural specificities.

Each week we will try to engage the ideas of four to five theorists considered as canonical to each respective school and discuss their relevance in Ibero American cultural and literary studies. The guiding objective of this survey seminar is the genealogical understanding of the situation of literary, cultural, and critical theory in Ibero America today. Some aspects I would like to foreground through the course are how both international and local schools of theory come about in relation to: Each student will be required to make six to eight short informal presentations of specific articles listed in our syllabus to help lead class discussion.

In each presentation they are expected to: Towards the end of the course each student is expect to be able to apply a theory or set of theories on the list to his or her own area of research. The idea is to: For the last few meetings, students will research and present on some new or unattended theory or theorist unaccounted for in the course. In consultation with the instructor, each will choose a book-length work to report on and make a reading selection to be distributed through Blackboard to the other seminar participants. Students will be expected to turn this presentation in to a book review for submission to E3W or another graduate or professional academic publication.

Theodor Adorno, with M. Michel Foucault, "What is an Author? Among the issues to be considered are:. English translations of most works will be available, but students are expected to work with these texts with full reading knowledge of English and either Spanish or Portuguese. Due to the complexity of the texts to be read, full knowledge of English and Spanish is required for this course, which will be conducted in English. Nevertheless, students from the English and the Comparative Literature Departments are encouraged to consult translations when these are available.

Concurrent enrollment required in L A Students must consult with Study Abroad Program Coordinator as tra vel and orientation dates may be in addition to these dates. Latin American Studies and S may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Only one of the following may be counted: Survey of works mostly in the Latin American and Hispanic literary tradition in which images or themes related to the East Asia, Eastern Africa, the Middle East are developed. Latin American Studies S Topic: Main literary trends and principal writers in Spanish America from the sixteenth century through Modernism.

Special attention will be paid the Cuban Revolution, Spanish editorial practices under Franco and after, publishing industry developments in Mexico City, Buenos Aires, and Havana and the rise of Latin American studies in U. After Spring Break, the course will shift to current debates about more recent trends in post-Boom Latin American writing by younger authors.

However, we will also consider in detail academic works in esthetic, cultural, critical, and field theory that address: Readings packet with short stories, chapters or articles by: Students will also read excerpts from theoretical works about narrative genres, the literary field, symbolic economy, minority literature and literary canon formation by such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Pierre Bourdieu, Jean Baudrillard, Gills Deleuze and John Guillory. What is the relationship between the Caribbean as a field of study and the creation of archives?

How do archives contribute to canonize or monumentalize a Caribbean writer or a historical figure? What forms of archiving--preservation of government records, manuscripts, letters, and unpublished materials; the search for and publication of "secondary" forms of writing--emerge in relationship to the study and the definition of the Caribbean as a region? How has the relationship between culture and archiving developed in colonial and postcolonial regions such as the Caribbean? How are race, slavery and post-slave society, class, and gender implicated in these issues?

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Is the Caribbean "archive" national, transnational, or diasporic? How have archival politics determined the relationship between literature and historiography in the Caribbean? This seminar will address such questions from contemporary archival theory while reviewing genre forms in Caribbean literature that occupy a hybrid space between fiction and documentation, literature and history, fantasy and fact: These are either literary writers, historians, or intellectual figures that have been involved in, have inspired or questioned the production, consolidation, or theorization of important Caribbean or Caribbean-related libraries, archives, or collections.

In the case of some writers, these archives in question may be the background for the production of works of historical fiction that we will discuss in class. The take-home exercise will consist ofone page essay questions related to the theories, texts, and methods discussed in class. The Latin American Short Story. Examination of the most representative Latin American authors as a course of study in the art of storytelling, literary history, individual poetics, and narrative theories.

Going both back and forward in Caribbean print culture, in this course I will consider similar polemics concerning the cosmopolitan vs. In doing so, I will also address current issues in Caribbean archival politics and fashioning such as journal valoration, acquisition, and preservation as academic capital. The numerical chapter headings already have hyperlinks, my kindle app lets me jump back and forth with just a couple finger taps, and in-text hyperlinks would have been distracting.

The introduction seemed to start off well until Appel started talking about literary involution. There is a lot of involution in Lolita, realism is deliberately thrown out the window sometimes, but I saw this as contributing to the comical effect and nothing more. Appel seems to interpret some kind of subjectivist philosophical meaning in it which I thought just went too far. His anecdote about the Puppet Show, and how his 5 and 3 year old children began laughing to steel themselves against the terror of questioning the reality of reality whatever that means was so stupid, I immediately skipped the rest of the Introduction and continued onto the Foreword.

Nabokov's commentary on Lolita at the end, however, was pleasant. To be clear - this review is specific to the Kindle edition of the annotated novel.

Lolita (Spanish Edition): Vladimir Nabokov: licapedu.tk: Books

I would give Lolita itself 5 stars and then some. There's around pages worth of footnotes and they have a link to the footnotes at the front of each chapter - but no link on the things that are being foot-noted and no indication at all that they were discussed. There's no easy way to switch back and forth between the footnotes and the main text. To look something up you basically have to page backwards to the first page of the chapter, click on the link, then page forward through the notes to the item you're interested in, then admittedly there IS a link provided there to send you back to the main text.

So to make the links work without constant paging back and forth, it's almost like you have to read the full notes for the chapter BEFORE reading the chapter. It's really distracting and pulling me out of the narrative. I thought it was going to be individual footnotes so I could look things up as I came across them - not one giant note for the whole chapter.

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Little individual footnotes was how the intro is formatted. You can jump from one footnote to another, from the footnote to multiple spots in the text, etc. But you can't jump directly from the text to the footnote! I think this is one book that would work a lot better with paper rather than this really poorly formatted ebook edition. See all 1, reviews. See all customer images. Most recent customer reviews. Published 6 days ago. Published 17 days ago. Published 19 days ago.

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Apr 04, Fabiola Fulco Salazar rated it really liked it. Trilce se asemeja a un combate. Transcribo partes de mi favorito: Triste destino el no haber sido sino muertos siempre. Ellos murieron siempre de vida. Cesar Vallejo's poetry is beautiful, sorrowful and rich. His words are as dark as death and as beautiful as what you'd imagine God to be. His political work is staggeringly intense, while the work that reflects his personal thought is sad and quiet. He is the poet many hope to become. Honestly one of the most prescient books of poetry I have ever read--released in , the same year as Eliot's Wasteland, and makes him look like a classicist baby.

This book basically jumps all the way to what people would write in the late 60s and early 70s, it comes from nowhere and now, appropriately, it is once again forgotten, referenced only in passing, and often disparagingly, when referencing the Latin American tradition of avant-gardism.

A book of the abyss, it must be read to be belie Honestly one of the most prescient books of poetry I have ever read--released in , the same year as Eliot's Wasteland, and makes him look like a classicist baby. A book of the abyss, it must be read to be believed—so read it! This is a blog I wrote midway into reading Vallejo. It is mostly quotes from Vallejo and the translator because the work and the translation process really speak for themselves in this case. It's rare that I read entire books of poetry, but that's only because I'm not normally compelled by young men in the Peruvian jungle to do so.

De tres meses de ausente y diez de dulce. Y los tres meses de ausencia.

I've been reading more and more writing in translation. One of my favorite parts of reading my favorite Peruvian authors, who like to make up words or put Spanish into Quechua syntax, is the accompanying essays by the translators. Clayton Eshleman translated the Vallejo book, and the above poem thusly: X The pristine and last stone of groundless fortune, has just died with soul and all, October bedroom and pregnant. Of three months of absent and ten of sweet. How destiny, mitred monodactyl, laughs. How at the rear conjunctions of contraries destroy all hope. How under every avatar's lineage the number always shows up.

How whales cut doves to fit. How these in turn leave their beak cubed as a third wing. How we saddleframe, facing monotonous croups. Ten months are towed toward the tenth, toward another beyond. Two at least are still in diapers. And the three months of absence. And the nine of gestation. There's not even any violence. The patient raises up. Eshleman talks about staying true to Vallejo's misspellings and inconsistent punctuation unless it's very clearly a printing mistake and about the ways he worked to find English-language equivalents for Vallejo's idioms, "Peruvianisms," nouns as verbs, verbs as nouns, and invented words.

This seems like a fairly obvious and artful, albeit very tedious, way to work as a translator, but according to Eshleman--and this kind of cattiness is another thing I like about reading translators' notes--Vallejo's past English-language translators had not been so careful. Eshleman's notes and explanations about his translating decisions with certain sticky words appear after his translation. After spending a few weeks trying to think and speak a language I barely know while speaking very basic English in order to be understood, this kind of precision is something I can really get into.

Feb 22, Laura Hartmark rated it it was amazing.